RACHAEL DOLEZAL: UH OH… SHE LIED!!!

Rachael Dolezal

I think that the big problem for a lot of people is that she lied…

Rachael Dolezal is facing a boatload of questions because of a lie that she has apparently been telling for years.  And now she has been exposed by……. her parents.  For those that don’t know the story, Dolezal has made her way to become president of the NAACP in Spokane, Washington. Her  biological parents have claimed that she has been misrepresenting herself as a black woman when her heritage is in fact white.

I have spoken with a number of people who have differing views as to whether she should be able to keep her job.  The overwhelming consensus is that she lied and should be removed from the position because of it.

I read an interesting article on this issue by Alicia Walters on THE GUARDIAN.  I am posting the full article below for you to peruse at your leisure:

Rachel Dolezal is, after this week, a symbol to many African Americans of the separation of blackness from black people; to me, she is an example of how American society simultaneously devalues the individuality of black women and us as a community to the point that the performance of black womanhood is preferred over the people. If blackness can simply be worn or performed, then every white woman with a weave and a cause, every white girl with a snap and a little attitude, can supplant the lived experiences of what it is to become a black woman: the journey of discrimination, the camaraderie of sisterhood, discovering the deep sense of responsibility and weight of the world, and ultimately finding the inner strength and acceptance that can only be built through struggle.

Rachel Dolezal may have perfected her performance of black womanhood, and she may be connected to black communities and feel an affinity with the styles and cultural innovations of black people. But the black identity cannot be put on like a pair of shoes. Our external differences from the white majority might be how others categorize us as black, but it’s the thread of our diverse lived experiences that make us black women.

Dolezal’s specious claims to black ancestry and faux black identity could not have been sustained and she would not have been able to pass if black womanhood were seen and understood as more than skin – or weave – deep. Wearing black womanhood was apparently even enough for Dolezal’s “fellow” black leaders in Spokane, Washington, who turned a blind eye to what the wider world now recognizes as her all-but laughable claims of racial identity, whether out of fear of rocking the boat or plain Northwestern niceness. Her charade could have only been maintained in a town (and within a society) with simplistic, stereotypical conceptions of blackness – that blackness is a shade on the range on olive to dark chocolate, a set of idioms delivered in a cadence from which American English derives its slang, and any number of bodily characteristics or mannerisms familiar across the globe, among others. And yet, while black Americans have long embraced a diverse array of lineages as kin, simply looking the part and faking the rest doesn’t cut it.

Whenever I tell people that I grew up in Spokane – a city in which only 2% of the population was black – I usually neutralize their confusion with a joke about how I was one of about seven black people, and five of us made it out. You see, black people aren’t supposed to live is small towns in the Pacific Northwest of this country; blackness has been defined as an “urban” identity. But while the majority of black people in the United States do still live in the southern states, and concentrations of black folks outside the south tend to be around metorpolitan areas, neither fact accounts for the constant migration of black people toward economic opportunities, including to places like Spokane. Their migration to Spokane in particular may just have been the inspiration for the establishment of the original headquarters of the Aryan Nations 37 miles [60km] away.

I was born in the middle of Spokane’s first (and only) black mayor’s tenure: a celebrated leader who black people worked hard to elect, and example of “acceptable” black leadership, Mayor Jim Chase once told the local paper that he “never knew much discrimination in Spokane.” While that was perhaps true for him, it was not my family’s experience, nor the experience of the black people who lived through segregation through the 1970s in Spokane. Though segregation was no longer enshrined in law in the 1980s when I was growing up, black folks still lived almost exclusively on the east side of town and in the historical neighborhoods built for railroad laborers. My Midwestern white mother and black Puerto Rican father had moved to Spokane for college and defied the unspoken segregation by starting their family in a working class north side neighborhood away from the black enclave, but hoping for the best. My father left the picture shortly after I was born and my mother navigated the discrimination we faced in school and throughout town – I became familiar with the meaning of “nigger” quite early in life.

As one of just two black girls in my elementary school, my kinky-ish hair, brown skin, and athletic build were uncommon and, before natural hair was considered cute, little white girls would shame me about about the size of my “poofy hair”. Throughout elementary school, in the confines of my bedroom, I put champagne-colored slips over my head to mimic the straight blonde hair I thought I needed to fit in, and gently swayed it back and forth and dreamt of belonging – but I knew black girls could never be white. When I was 10, my father, to the surprise and disgust of my mother, took me to the JC Penney salon in Seattle (300 miles [482km] away) to chemically straighten my hair and get my eyebrows and upper lip waxed. The first black man in my life, and he taught me that being a black woman meant trying to conform to white standards of beauty.

But when I was 14, I gave up the relaxers and transitioned into rocking my natural kinky-ish afro. It instilled a new kind of confidence in me: I could not hang my head and wear this beautiful crown. My mother had not raised me to be an invisible, go-along-to-get-along gal, and, though I still harbored jealousy of my white peers with their incessant hair flipping, I decided to stand out instead of try and fail to fit in. I wore bright, creative clothing; I embraced my love of dance, of song, of sports, of speaking truthfully about race with little care for whether people attributed any of it to my blackness or to me. To be able to get to a place where I could be myself, I felt powerful: I wanted to do and be everything and, as I learned more about the history of the Atlantic slave trade, African diaspora, and white privilege, I wanted to tell these white people about themselves.

Realizing that I was hyper-visible and yet never truly seen, I started a club called Helping Overcome Prejudice Everywhere (Hope) with my brother. Each semester, my Spanish teacher would let me take over her class to lead my classmates through workshops on white privilege; it eventually became an established leadership course.

On the surface, I was successful, but I also longed for the recognition of fellow black people, including my few black male peers for whom I was seemingly nonexistent: all of them, including my brothers, were busy chasing the hair-flippers. We may have been teammates in track or they might’ve been my brother’s friends, but the boys who I thought would be my best chance at external validation as an attractive woman left me wanting.

In Spokane in general, I rarely saw black men coupled with black women; more than a few men in our small black community had white wives and girlfriends, while the black women always seemed to be single. Naive, I imagined that, on the tightly-knit east side, there were churches full of black women who were coupled with and loved by black men. But on the streets of Spokane, in the public spaces at festivals, in restaurants, and wherever else I looked, black and white men alike were always more interested in white women than women who looked like me; what I took from those years were that black women were far from desirable partners.

To be a black young woman in Spokane was, for me, to be rejected, isolated and left to find my own way. Becoming the black woman I am today was not about learning a performance, it was not about certain clothing or my hair texture; it came from first being a black girl, from the trauma of rejection and isolation and its transformation into a kind of self-taught solitary pride, from learning to preserve my own sense of true self.

Dolezal managed to put on an identity – that of a black woman – in a way that renders invisible the experiences that actually forged for us our identities as black women. She presented to the world the trappings of black womanhood without the burden of having to have lived them for most of her life. She represented us and gained status in both black and white communities as one of us, even though she could have worn her whiteness and talked to white people about their racism – something sorely needed in a town like Spokane.

Had she really understood the history of black women in America, Dolezal would have recognized that she is perpetuating a fetish for black women’s bodies that devalues actual black women while celebrating our parts when attached to the right (white) form. But she was not alone in this act of playing black and benefiting from it. Since black womanhood is apparently all in the look, our society would rather have white, former Disney pop stars twerk, talentless celebrities with enlarged backsides and their equally talentless siblings with swollen lips than celebrate the black woman’s form with the person who carries it. Black women learn that we are not desirable, that we are invisible, and yet we are imitated by the world’s Dolezals and in our popular culture. Little black girls like me could never have passed for white – and would’ve been ridiculed if we tried – but anyone with the right accessories can now seemingly claim to be black women when it suits them.

Spokane was, for once, perhaps just ahead of the curve: we might be moments away from declaring that simply wearing Black Woman is enough to be a black woman … or even preferable to it.

THIS WOMAN IS UPSET WITH BRUCE/CAITLYN JENNER

Check out this youtube.com video.  This lady (Talisa Andrews) is very upset with Bruce/Caitlyn Jenner.  In case you don’t know who Jenner is, he is the gold -medal winning Olympic athlete who was married three times (once to Kim Kardashian’s mother Kris).  He is in the process of transitioning into a woman.   Andrews starts off by issuing a disclaimer to the LGBT Community and then she snaps.  Hit me up and let me know what you think about this one.

CREFLO DOLLAR’S CHURCH GIVING HIM $65 MILLION JET

crazy-creflo

I’m not even commenting on this article.  I’ll just give it to you as I got it.

 

According to AJC online:

It’s their money and they can spend it on a $65 million jet if they want to, the board of directors for Creflo Dollar’s ministry said.

“We plan to acquire a Gulfstream G650 because it is the best, and it is a reflection of the level of excellence at which this organization chooses to operate,” leaders of World Changers Church International said.

In a lengthy statement published online, ministry leaders also acknowledged a fundraising video featuring its founder missed the mark — sorta.

“There was no pressure of any kind applied to anyone, but rather an opportunity was presented to those in our community who may be inclined to participate and who stand to benefit from the global mobility of our ministry leaders,” the ministry said. “We fully acknowledge that the campaign video did not do a good job of communicating the request, and we apologize for any confusion it may have caused – it is in the process of being revamped and will be re-released when complete.”

In March, a video featuring the televangelist Dollar was online a matter of days before it was pulled down. Dollar’s ministry sought $300 donations from 200,000 people in order to purchase the Gulfstream G650, a twin-engine jet that will comfortably seat 18. Those 18 seats that would allow Dollar, his wife Taffi, and 16 others to safely share the love of Jesus, a spokesman for the ministry said.

Dollar’s request for the top-of-the-line plane drew sharp criticism from many who questioned the need for such a high-priced investment. Plus, experts told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, the plane has no room for cargo such as pounds of food and other goods to carry to those in need.

Dollar fired back in front of his congregation in a video posted on YouTube.

“If I want to believe God for a $65 million plane, you cannot stop me,” Dollar told his followers. “You cannot stop me from dreaming. I’m gonna dream until Jesus comes.”

In the board’s recent statement, church leaders said the fundraising appeal was intended for a “specific community of like-minded people” among its millions of followers. Church leaders cited safety as a reason for buying the Gulfstream G650.

Dollar isn’t the first mega-church pastor to require a private jet rather than relying on commercial airlines to spread Christianity. A list compiled in 2011 shows 20 other ministries also have their own jets, though none are the G650.

Dollar established his ministry in 1981 while a student at West Georgia College, where he also met his wife, according to his church’s website. His first service was held in 1986 in an elementary school cafeteria, and in 1988, the Dollars purchased the former Atlanta Christian Center Church in College Park.

In 1995, the ministry moved into its current location, the 8,500-seat “World Dome” on Burdett Road.

PREACH

There’s a new preacher’s reality show coming to Lifetime and I’m not sure what to say about the above trailer.  There are four “prophetesses” in this particular show.  They are:  Belinda Scott (Cleveland Heights, Ohio); Taketa Williams (Columbus, Ohio); Linda Roark (Trenton, Ohio); and Kelly Crews (Cleveland, Ohio).

“Preach” is the latest Christianity-based offering of  reality shows.  There was TLC’s “The Sisterhood” (cancelled after one season), Oxygen’s Preachers of LA (my favorite), and the spinoff Preacher’s of Detroit (I also like). Lifetime has also been showing “Preacher’s Daughtrers” for three seasons.  Check out the trailer above and let me know if you’ll be watching…..

 

CREFLO DOLLAR RESPONDS…

crazy-creflo

I really have no words for this comical dose of spiritual manipulation that’s served on a  platter of “the devil’s trying to discredit me”.  Sometimes people USE church for the wrong thing and that’s to manipulate money out of the parishioner’s pockets.

It’s been about a month since televangelist Creflo Dollar made headlines after his campaign for supporters to buy him a $65 million dollar plane. “If I want to believe God for a $65 million plane, you cannot stop me,” Dollar told his followers. “You cannot stop me from dreaming. I’m gonna dream until Jesus comes.”

Below is a video from his church showing Dollar blasting his critics of his short-lived campaign to raise the $65 million dollars for his new jet.

ARIZONA OFFICER INTENTIONALLY RUNS OVER SUSPECT

I don’t really have time to give you all of the particulars on this one but trust me, it’s graphic and worth seeing.  Apparently the suspect in this video would not stop and is headed to an area where there are people in an office building.  Deadly force is warranted according to police.  What happens next is straight out of a movie……

MONEY AND CHURCH IN THE NOW…

CHURCH

Today is Sunday and many people attend the church of their choice.  Most churches are filled with mostly women.  I’m not really sure why.  A lot of “salesmen” typically cater…to women for one reason or another.   What I am sure about is that churches are BIG BUSINESS!  Not only that,  though I do attend church regularly, I find that there seems to be an issue in part with organized religion.

One of the major problems with organized religion is this money component that seems to be extremely prevalent.  I’ve heard of many pastors who not only preach but they also handle the purse strings at their church as well.  This leads to “absolute power” and… as I heard stated earlier in life:  ABSOLUTE POWER RUINS!  When I first heard this phrase, I really did not understand it.  As I grew older and exposed to various and sundry things, I certainly came upon the realization of what that phrase means.

When an individual has ABSOLUTE POWER it brings about corruption.  One would think that the church would be the last place that you would find corruption, yet that is not the case.  I think we all have seen news stories where preachers have been arrested for taking money from their congregation.  Recently a Delaware pastor, Eric Sapp was sentenced to 5 years probation  for stealing more than $56,000 from Grace Baptist Church. In Houston, an associate pastor, Russell Thompson, is charged with felony theft of $250,000.  In Cleveland, Pastor Merita White, was convicted of stealing $150,000 from a member of her congregation, Mattie Cunningham. There are more stories of this than I care to repeat.

Basically, organized religion often causes competition between different religions and it forces people to lose focus on the major theme set forth in the Bible.  That theme is LOVE. There are many who call some of these pastors PIMPS IN THE PULPIT because of their emphasis on dollars rather than biblical sense.

I am posting the top 10 list of the richest pastors in the world.  I think this list is from a year ago and I’m pretty sure that Joel Olsteen is in the top 10 but they do not have him on this list.  I think I saw somewhere that his net worth is estimated at $40 million dollars.  Am I saying that they are stealing from their congregations?  Most definitely not!  What I am saying is that the church of today is BIG BUSINESS and… everything you see, is not what you see.  I hope you see what I mean.

Top 10 Richest Pastors In The World

 

This is a list of the richest pastors worldwide.

  1. Bishop T. D Jakes: Bishop Jakes lives in a $1,700,000 mansion, he has been called America’s best preacher and has been featured on the cover of TIME magazine. He is a writer, preacher and movie producer. Thomas Dexter “T. D.” Jakes, Sr. is the bishop/chief pastor of The Potter’s House, a non-denominational American mega church, with 30,000 members, located in Dallas, Texas. T.D Jakes wears custom made suits and sports a diamond ring the size of a coin. This man of God has been endowed with a $150 million net worth.

td jakes

 

  1. Bishop David Oyedepo: Bishop David Oyedepo is a Nigerian Preacher, Christian Author, Founder and Presiding Bishop of Winners Chapel known as Living Faith Church World Wide. Has been hailed as the wealthiest preacher in Nigeria with a total net worth of $150 million and properties like 4 private jets and homes in the United States and England. After the foundation of the Living Faith Outreach Ministry in 1981, it has evolved to be one of the largest congregations in Africa and has a flourishing mission in Nairobi.

oy

3.  E A Adeboye: This messenger of God was listed in an African magazine, NEWSWEEK, as the most powerful man in Africa and one of the top 50 global power elites in 2008/2009, among others such as President Barack Obama and Nicolas Sarkozy. Pastor Adeboye heads the Redeemed Christian Church of God (RCCG), something he has done for the last 28years.Amongst his posessions are private jets.

ea

4.  Benny Hinn: Israeli televangelist,Toufik Benedictus “Benny” Hinn has an estimated net worth of $42 million. He is best known for his regular “Miracle Crusades” – revival meeting/faith healing summits that are usually held in large stadiums in major cities, which are later broadcast worldwide on his television program, “This Is Your Day”. Hinn was born on December 3, 1952.

hinn

5.  Chris Oyakhilome: This is the man behind Believers’ Loveworld Ministries, a.k.a Christ Embassy.His church has an estimated net worth of $30 million – $50 million last year, the charismatic preacher was at the center of a $35 million money laundering case in which he was accused of siphoning funds from his church to foreign banks.

chris

6.  Creflo Dollar: American Bible teacher, pastor, and the founder of World Changers Church International, Creflo Dollar, has an estimated net worth of $27 million. As his name suggests, this preacher’s “manna” comes in form of the green buck.

creflo

7.  Kenneth Copeland: He runs Kenneth Copeland Ministries, was one of several televangelists whose finances were investigated from 2007 to 2011 by Republican Sen. Charles Grassley of Iowa.

According to an article by the Associated Press that ran in 2008, “His ministry’s 1,500-acre campus, behind an iron gate a half-hour drive from Fort Worth includes a church, a private airstrip, a hangar for the ministry’s $17.5 million jet and other aircraft, and a $6 million church owned lakefront mansion.

The article later added that while Copeland has not released up-to-date salary statements, “the church disclosed in a property-tax exemption application that his wages were $364,577 in 1995; Copeland’s wife, Gloria, earned $292,593. It’s not clear whether those figures include other earnings, such as special offerings for guest preaching or book royalties.”

copeland

  1. Billy Graham: American evangelical Christian evangelist, William Franklin “Billy” Graham, Jr., has a net worth of $25 million. The Southern Baptist evangelist rose to celebrity status as his sermons started getting broadcast on radio and television. Graham was born on a dairy farm near Charlotte, North Carolina in 1918, he has conducted many evangelistic crusades since 1948. He is now a world renowned televangelist raking in millions of dollars.

billy

9.  Matthew Ashimolowo: Ashimolowo, the owner of Kingsway International Christian Centre (KICC) gets an annual income of $200,000. Having his humble beginnings as a priest in Foursquare Gospel Church, a Nigerian church that sent Ashimolowo to open a satellite branch in London. Pastor Matthew had other ideas and decided to set up his own church instead. Today, his Kingsway International Christian Center is reportedly the largest Pentecostal church in the whole of the United Kingdom.

Matthew Ashimolowo

10.  Temitope Joshua: Synagogue Church Of All Nations (SCOAN) has an estimated net worth: $10 million – $15 million Nigeria’s most controversial clergyman is also one of its richest and most philanthropic. T.B Joshua heads the Synagogue Church of all Nations (SCOAN), a congregation he founded in 1987, which accommodates over 15,000 worshippers on Sundays.

Temitope Joshua